2 years ago today I walked away from my identity and into my purpose

It was a bit surreal, for sure, as I packed up a box containing close to two decades of seemingly meaningless items from my life in corporate America. I then walked out of my corner office, handed over my badge, and exited a building that I once fought desperately, many years before, to enter.

My corporate career quest started during my junior year at college when I decided to volunteer my time to prove myself with a local fast growing company. At the time, they were only hiring engineers, and as a Business major, I had no choice but to use free labor as a way to get in the door. After several interviews over the course of 10 months, and two rejection letters (one from a co-founder), I overcame their concerns, and was officially hired on June 5, 1995. I was on top of the world!

Over the next two decades there was not a single day of my employment that went by that I took for granted. I worked every day with level of passion, integrity, and appreciation, never losing touch with...

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Keeping the Mind in the Mind-Body-Spirit Approaches to Well-Being

Women seeking treatment for “infertility” are increasingly considering alternative methods to help cope with the anxiety, stress, and uncertainty for the future they experience as they struggle with mainstream infertility treatment without success.  Mind-Body-Spirit approaches to treating infertility, whether used as standalone methods or accompaniments to traditional infertility treatments, offer women the opportunity to reconnect with their bodies and their spirits through movement, nutrition, and acupuncture (energy flow), to name but a few. 

As a researcher of women struggling with “infertility” we contend that we need to put the “Mind” back into a mind-body-spirit approach to health and well-being.  As a psychologist, I believe that movement, nutrition and energy flow are central to our well-being.  Through our research, we have also found that a cognitive restructuring is also necessary to help mitigate the isolation...

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Amazon where is my baby?

I’m not sure honestly if I can say this statistic (after 6 months of trying 70% of women experienced great concern with the inability to conceive) came as a great surprise to me. In many ways, we are a society that has been groomed to believe that  life is on-demand, that we are a click away from exactly what we want when we want it.  Amazon.com, social media, and other modern systems  have changed the way we view our interaction with material things from music, to food, to books, to products, and has established an unprecedented expectation of immediacy. This expectation will be fueled even more with the upcoming announcement of drone delivery service. It’s pretty safe to say that we are not a society that is tolerant of delay.


So why would I be surprised to learn that this  mindset has poured into our physical world? After all, we are planned, scheduled, and timed human beings. We are all maneuvering through life’s master to-do list with the...

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My Personal Journey as Chief Researcher and Why This Matters

Uncategorized Mar 09, 2017

My names is Kate Webster, PhD. I am the Chief Researcher at Organic Conceptions.  I specialize in social psychology and multivariate research methods. I have over 20-years-experience conducting research for companies from fortune 500 companies to non-profits to small startups.  In addition, I teach statistics, developmental psychology, and social psychology with an emphasis on culture and gender studies at the University of Rhode Island.    

Organic Conception’s story begins with Marc and Erin’s (Founders) personal struggle with infertility that spanned close to a decade.  During their struggle they would hear or read stories about couples who had conceived naturally after adopting a child, choosing another path, “letting go”, accepting what was, etc.. Hearing these stories was always a painful and frustrating experience for Erin and Marc, until, they became one of them, not just once, but twice.   

Marc and Erin were...

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